Forthcoming Papers

“Sharing R&D Risk in Healthcare via FDA Hedges” by Adam Jorring, Andrew Lo, Tomas J. Philipson,
Manita Singh, and Richard T. Thakor

“Information asymmetry, financial intermediation, and wealth effects of project finance loans” by Andrew Ferguson and Peter Lam

Paper Spotlight: The Effect of Taxation on Corporate Financing and Investment

Hong Chen

Murray Z. Frank

Despite the large theoretical literature that asserts the importance of taxes on corporate investment and financing decisions, the empirical literature often fails to demonstrate the effects of taxes in a convincing way. One reason for the discrepancy could be measurement error in variables. In “The Effect of Taxation on Corporate Financing and Investment,” Hong Chen and Murray Z. Frank take issue with the theoretical predictions themselves. They construct a model with a household and a firm that are both infinitely-lived. The government collects taxes from both parties. In the steady-state equilibrium of the model, many personal taxes are irrelevant to corporate decision-making, and other forms of taxation affect particular corporate decisions only. Specifically, (i) a small change in many personal taxes (including on consumption, dividend, or capital gains) has no effect on the firm’s investment or financing policies, (ii) a small change in the personal tax on interest income affects leverage but not investment, and (iii) a small change in the corporate tax rate affects leverage and investment, but not the interest rate on corporate debt. The first-order conditions pin down the optimal policies of the firm and the consumer, and the authors show that in a steady-state equilibrium, these conditions are not affected by some of the tax rates (significantly, including the dividend tax rate). A numerical example shows the change in the steady-state equilibrium outcomes to a change in various tax rates. If the theory on tax effects does not match the data, perhaps the theory needs to be reconsidered, and this paper represents an important step in that direction.

Spotlight by Uday Rajan
Photos courtesy of Hong Chen and Murray Z. Frank

Call for Papers and Proposals: RCFS Winter Conference 2022

The 2022 RCFS Winter Conference is now accepting submissions. Please see the Call for Papers and the Call for Registered Reports/Proposals on “Finance for the Greater Good” for more details. The conference, which features a dual submission option with RCFS, will take place February 19-20, at the Margaritaville Hollywood Beach Resort in Florida.

The sponsoring editors are Andrew Ellul, Isil Erel, Camelia Kuhnen, and Robert Marquez. The submission deadline is November 19, 2021, for papers and December 5, 2021, for registered reports.

SFS Post-Doc Position Available

UPDATED OCTOBER 26, 2021: The position has been filled.

An SFS Advisory Editor position is available for the next academic year; the start date is flexible.  The position is a particularly good fit for finance/economics post-docs or late-stage PhD students.  The primary task is to provide editorial support in the review process and requires about 10 hours per week with a minimum commitment for one year (or preferably for two years). The position allows working closely with the RFS/RAPS/RCFS editors and for ample time to continue work on one’s own research.  Salary is competitive.  The position will remain open until filled.  To apply, please submit a cover letter, graduate course work, any working papers, and three letters of recommendation to Jan Sokolowsky.